Longevity Institute Blog Dr Edmond Devroey's Blog

29Sep/10309

Why Do We Suffocate Our Newborns?

In nature no mammal ever obstructed the blood circulation of her newborn.
Why do we, humans, prematurely clamp the umbilical cord of our babies?
Do we know better than Mother nature?

In the womb a baby relies on his placenta for oxygen (and nutrient) supply.

The volume of blood (1) flowing to the placenta in the two umbilical arteries, (2) circulating in the placenta and (3) flowing from the placenta back into the baby represent a sizable part of the babies total blood volume.
After birth, the baby will have to use his lungs for oxygenation, which is to say that he has to switch part of his blood circulation from the placenta to the lungs.
During that switch the placenta gradually empties while the blood vessels of the lungs slowly enlarge as to accept the blood that no longer flows to the placenta.
Meanwhile the newborn starts inhaling very progressively, by little increments, while dribbling some fluid out of his airways and each time expanding his lungs a little more.

The switch is progressive and can take a few minutes to complete. The whole process unfolds naturally and needs NO assistance.

Clamping the umbilical cord BEFORE the end of the switch not only robs the newborn of part of his blood, it also abruptly suppresses his oxygen supply.
To avoid suffocation the newborn has no other resource than to explodes in a brutal respiratory effort. The process is painful and makes the baby cry loudly.

More reasons to improve childbirth

Filed under: Childbirth 309 Comments
14Sep/10279

Heartburn

Recently, Dr. Mercola came up with an informative page about heartburn. As rightfully described by Dr. Mercola—and previously by Dr. Joel Wallach, acid reflux does not result from too much acid. On the contrary, acid deficiency allows bacteria and yeast to grow in the stomach. They generate gas resulting in reflux and belching.

Recommendation from the Longevity Institute

- One or two tablespoons of the following old Vermont folk medicine remedy in a glass of fresh water helps lessen the severity of the stomach pain and the bloating. The Vermont folk medicine remedy is made of one volume of liquid honey mixed with one volume of organic apple cider vinegar.
The vinegar helps restore the stomach acidity and the honey attenuates the sour taste of the vinegar.
Shake well and store refrigerated.

- It is also recommended:

A) To always chew food thoroughly. Introducing saliva into the food as you chew will get the digestion process off to a good start.
B) Not to drink very much liquid while eating a meal. Also trying to limit fluids for 30 minutes before you eat and for an hour afterward.
C) Not to overeat. Leave that extra little bit of room for dessert, and then skip it.
D) To eliminate from the diet foods that have refined sugars. Sugars tend to destabilize the stomach, decreasing the efficiency of the digestion and creating gas.
E)To avoid caffeine and fried foods. Caffeine stops starch digestion and can impair acid production.

5Sep/10205

Premature Childbirth and Diet

The review article: "The Enigma of Spontaneous Preterm Birth", publishes February 11, 2010 by the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), concludes that inflammation plays a major role in preterm childbirth and suggests researching how (quote) "...host-microbe interactions shape the immune response, possibly increasing or decreasing the likelihood that an inflammatory response will be directed against the fetus..." (end quote).

COMMENTS:
1 - The inflammation process that plays a major role in preterm childbirth could well be the result of the sugar and essential omega-6 fatty acids excess in our diet.
An Excess of sugar (hyperglycemia) is a potent inflammatory agent and the omega-6 essential fatty acids exaggerate the immune response to inflammation.

2 - The article rightfully states that the medical approach to increased preterm childbirth results in more premature babies staying alive but that preterm childbirth: (quote) "remains costly in terms of both the suffering of infants and their families..." (end quote).